Law firm committed to serving exclusively Native American tribes and tribal organizations through the United States

Welcoming Our New Partners. Rovianne Leigh and Alexandra Page have become Partners in the firm.

Berkey Williams LLP is pleased to announce the promotion of Rovianne A. Leigh and Alexandra C. Page to partner.

Ms. Leigh became the firm’s first Public Interest Indian Law Fellow after graduating from the U.C. Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall), and continued with Berkey Williams LLP as an associate.  Ms. Leigh’s practice focuses on the protection of tribal environmental and cultural resources, Indian child welfare, Tribal Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (Tribal TANF), tribal court development, tribal governance, litigation, administrative law, employment and Indian health.  Ms. Leigh negotiated the first Memorandum of Understanding regarding Indian child welfare between an Indian tribe and a County Child Welfare Services Department in Northern California.  She also appears regularly in tribal court on Indian child welfare and employment matters.  Along with partners Curtis Berkey and Scott Williams, Ms. Leigh teaches the Advanced Indian Law seminar at the U.C. Berkeley School of Law.  She was awarded the Honorable Thelton E. Henderson Social Justice Prize by the U.C. Berkeley School of Law in 2012 for her work in Indian country.  Ms. Leigh is admitted to practice in California and Hawaii.

Ms. Page joined Berkey Williams LLP in 2007 after nine years as a staff attorney at a nonprofit Indian law organization in Washington, D.C.  Ms. Page’s practice focuses on land recovery, protection of Indian Nation sovereignty and of cultural and environmental resources, strengthening Indian governments, and conducting Nation to Nation relations with the United States.  She has represented Indian nations in federal and state litigation; multi-party negotiations with local, state, and federal governments; and in state and federal rule-making processes.  Her work includes international legal advocacy for indigenous peoples and incorporates the principles of international human rights law into domestic advocacy for indigenous peoples.  Ms. Page received her J.D. with honors from the University of Chicago Law School, and her B.A. from Williams College.  Ms. Page is admitted to practice in the District of Columbia.